RI Med Tech

Following a brief career in the military that ended with a shoulder injury, 15 months of rehab, and eventual medical discharge. I drifted around for a while doing various bits of temporary work and training as a swimming teacher. Whilst teaching children to swim I found out about the robotics programme at UWE and applied. During my 3rd week at university, I spoke to Dr Appolinaire Etoundi, upon finding out about the projects that he was working on and wanted to get involved immediately. This started me on a path of looking into the development of assistive living devices.

In my second year of university, I had a discussion with a parent of a child I was teaching to swim, about developing assistive technology for their daughter. The first time I met with her I felt an overwhelming compulsion to help, and that compulsion continues to drive me in what we do. It’s my belief that if I have the ability and the skills to help people, I have a responsibility to do so. 

I took this story to Appolinaire and we started to design an assisted walking technology, but our solution was not suitable for her and the extent of her disease. We also, unfortunately, did not get the funding required to build a prototype. 

Off the back of this design project, I got invited to join a prosthetics project where I started working on Smart Prosthetics research and design, and where I met Tania Goddard. She and I had a very long conversation about life in a wheelchair, how she feels that there is not enough support, and the products are too expensive. I began to design disability products which lines up with my underlying compulsion, and the original reason for starting Rose Industries and brought me to what I consider to be my purpose in life.  

Jump forward five years and I am now running Rose Industries, under which operates 3 wings that are all built to create revenue and develop skills that can be used to fund and support the development of assistive technologies and eventually prosthetics and bionics. 

I met Theo in my foundation year at university, we were both on the engineering foundation course with the aim of doing Robotics. He joined Rose Industries two or three years before Rose Industries was even founded and we enthused each other with ideas of little robots. We bought our first 3d printer and started playing with 3d design and production, printing trinkets, games and characters. When the research project into smart sockets came around, Theo was instrumental in supporting me and the project, and has been heavily involved in the supporting projects that are contributing towards this research ever since.

Theo went on to graduate from the Robotics programme in 2020, subsequently completing a masters in health technologies at UWE in 2022.

Theo is currently the lead developer for Rose Hub, our software branch of Rose Industries. He is both the giants shoulders on which I stand, and a shoulder to cry on. Supporting both me and Rose Industries through all of the challenges (emotional and practical) of the last five years.

Seb came to uni as a mature student and seemed already to have a direction in mind, intent on working on bionics and augmented prosthetics, and after a few weeks of working alongside each other he opened up to me about his past career in construction which came to an abrupt stop after a brief fall, and a broken spine, hand and ribs.  

Since then he managed to move his work from being on site, to being off site as a sustainability consultant, and eventually was inspired to return to education – after his uncle cut his own hand off with a circular saw – in the hopes to one day be able to provide a solution for people that have suffered those sorts of injuries. 

Seb made a full recovery from his injuries, but now focuses his time and energy on telling the Rose Industries story, and works alongside myself as a project manager for both the Print Hub and MedTech, alongside his studies at the university.  

Accessibility Toolbar

Mike's Story

Following a brief career in the military that ended with a shoulder injury, 15 months of rehab, and eventual medical discharge, I drifted around for a while doing various bits of temporary work and training as a swimming teacher. Whilst teaching children to swim, I found out about the robotics programme at UWE and applied. During my third week at university, I spoke to Dr Appolinaire Etoundi, finding out about the projects that he was working on started me on a path of looking into the development of assistive living devices.
In my second year of university, I had a discussion with a parent of a child I was teaching to swim, about developing assistive technology for their daughter. The first time I met with her I felt an overwhelming compulsion to help, and that compulsion continues to drive me in what we do. It’s my belief that if I have the ability and the skills to help people, I have a responsibility to do so.
I took this story to Appolinaire and we started to design an assisted walking technology. Unfortunately, our solution was not suitable for her and the extent of her disability. We also, unfortunately, did not get the funding required to build a prototype.
Off the back of this design project, I got invited to join a prosthetics project where I started working on Smart Prosthetics research and design, and where I met Tania Goddard. She and I had a very long conversation about life as a wheelchair user, how she feels that there is not enough support, and that the products are too expensive. I began to design disability products which lines up with my underlying compulsion, and the original reason for starting Rose Industries and brought me to what I consider to be my purpose in life.
Jump forward five years and I am now running Rose Industries, under which operates three wings that are all built to create revenue and develop skills that can be used to fund and support the development of assistive technologies and eventually prosthetics and bionics.

Theo's Story

“>I met Theo in my foundation year at university, we were both on the engineering foundation course with the aim of doing Robotics. He joined Rose Industries two or three years before Rose Industries was even founded and we enthused each other with ideas of little robots. We bought our first 3d printer and started playing with 3d design and production, printing trinkets, games and characters. When the research project into smart sockets came around, Theo was instrumental in supporting me and the project, and has been heavily involved in the supporting projects that are contributing towards this research ever since.
Theo went on to graduate from the Robotics programme in 2020, subsequently completing a masters in health technologies at UWE in 2022.
Theo is currently the lead developer for Rose Hub, our software branch of Rose Industries. He is both the giants shoulders on which I stand, and a shoulder to cry on. Supporting both me and Rose Industries through all of the challenges (emotional and practical) of the last five years.

Seb's Story

Seb came to uni as a mature student and seemed already to have a direction in mind, intent on working on bionics and augmented prosthetics. After a few weeks of working alongside each other he opened up to me about his past career in construction which came to an abrupt stop after a brief fall, and a broken spine, hand and ribs.
Since then he managed to move his work from being on site, to being off site as a sustainability consultant, and eventually was inspired to return to education – after his uncle cut his own hand off with a circular saw – in the hopes to one day be able to provide a solution for people that have suffered those sorts of injuries.
Seb made a full recovery from his injuries, but now focuses his time and energy on telling the Rose Industries story, and works alongside myself as a project manager for both the Print Hub and MedTech, alongside his studies at the university.